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BBC Micro Elite

Text: BPRNT

Name: BPRNT [View in context] Type: Subroutine Category: Text Summary: Print a 32-bit number, left-padded to a specific number of digits, with an optional decimal point Deep dive: Printing decimal numbers
Print the 32-bit number stored in K(0 1 2 3) to a specific number of digits, left-padding with spaces for numbers with fewer digits (so lower numbers are right-aligned). Optionally include a decimal point. See the deep dive on "Printing decimal numbers" for details of the algorithm used in this routine. Arguments: K(0 1 2 3) The number to print, stored with the most significant byte in K and the least significant in K+3 (i.e. as a big-endian number, which is the opposite way to how the 6502 assembler stores addresses, for example) U The maximum number of digits to print, including the decimal point (spaces will be used on the left to pad out the result to this width, so the number is right- aligned to this width). U must be 11 or less C flag If set, include a decimal point followed by one fractional digit (i.e. show the number to 1 decimal place). In this case, the number in K(0 1 2 3) contains 10 * the number we end up printing, so to print 123.4, we would pass 1234 in K(0 1 2 3) and would set the C flag to include the decimal point
.BPRNT LDX #11 \ Set T to the maximum number of digits allowed (11 STX T \ characters, which is the number of digits in 10 \ billion). We will use this as a flag when printing \ characters in TT37 below PHP \ Make a copy of the status register (in particular \ the C flag) so we can retrieve it later BCC TT30 \ If the C flag is clear, we do not want to print a \ decimal point, so skip the next two instructions DEC T \ As we are going to show a decimal point, decrement DEC U \ both the number of characters and the number of \ digits (as one of them is now a decimal point) .TT30 LDA #11 \ Set A to 11, the maximum number of digits allowed SEC \ Set the C flag so we can do subtraction without the \ C flag affecting the result STA XX17 \ Store the maximum number of digits allowed (11) in \ XX17 SBC U \ Set U = 11 - U + 1, so U now contains the maximum STA U \ number of digits minus the number of digits we want INC U \ to display, plus 1 (so this is the number of digits \ we should skip before starting to print the number \ itself, and the plus 1 is there to ensure we print at \ least one digit) LDY #0 \ In the main loop below, we use Y to count the number \ of times we subtract 10 billion to get the leftmost \ digit, so set this to zero STY S \ In the main loop below, we use location S as an \ 8-bit overflow for the 32-bit calculations, so \ we need to set this to 0 before joining the loop JMP TT36 \ Jump to TT36 to start the process of printing this \ number's digits .TT35 \ This subroutine multiplies K(S 0 1 2 3) by 10 and \ stores the result back in K(S 0 1 2 3), using the fact \ that K * 10 = (K * 2) + (K * 2 * 2 * 2) ASL K+3 \ Set K(S 0 1 2 3) = K(S 0 1 2 3) * 2 by rotating left ROL K+2 ROL K+1 ROL K ROL S LDX #3 \ Now we want to make a copy of the newly doubled K in \ XX15, so we can use it for the first (K * 2) in the \ equation above, so set up a counter in X for copying \ four bytes, starting with the last byte in memory \ (i.e. the least significant) .tt35 LDA K,X \ Copy the X-th byte of K(0 1 2 3) to the X-th byte of STA XX15,X \ XX15(0 1 2 3), so that XX15 will contain a copy of \ K(0 1 2 3) once we've copied all four bytes DEX \ Decrement the loop counter BPL tt35 \ Loop back to copy the next byte until we have copied \ all four LDA S \ Store the value of location S, our overflow byte, in STA XX15+4 \ XX15+4, so now XX15(4 0 1 2 3) contains a copy of \ K(S 0 1 2 3), which is the value of (K * 2) that we \ want to use in our calculation ASL K+3 \ Now to calculate the (K * 2 * 2 * 2) part. We still ROL K+2 \ have (K * 2) in K(S 0 1 2 3), so we just need to shift ROL K+1 \ it twice. This is the first one, so we do this: ROL K \ ROL S \ K(S 0 1 2 3) = K(S 0 1 2 3) * 2 = K * 4 ASL K+3 \ And then we do it again, so that means: ROL K+2 \ ROL K+1 \ K(S 0 1 2 3) = K(S 0 1 2 3) * 2 = K * 8 ROL K ROL S CLC \ Clear the C flag so we can do addition without the \ C flag affecting the result LDX #3 \ By now we've got (K * 2) in XX15(4 0 1 2 3) and \ (K * 8) in K(S 0 1 2 3), so the final step is to add \ these two 32-bit numbers together to get K * 10. \ So we set a counter in X for four bytes, starting \ with the last byte in memory (i.e. the least \ significant) .tt36 LDA K,X \ Fetch the X-th byte of K into A ADC XX15,X \ Add the X-th byte of XX15 to A, with carry STA K,X \ Store the result in the X-th byte of K DEX \ Decrement the loop counter BPL tt36 \ Loop back to add the next byte, moving from the least \ significant byte to the most significant, until we \ have added all four LDA XX15+4 \ Finally, fetch the overflow byte from XX15(4 0 1 2 3) ADC S \ And add it to the overflow byte from K(S 0 1 2 3), \ with carry STA S \ And store the result in the overflow byte from \ K(S 0 1 2 3), so now we have our desired result, i.e. \ \ K(S 0 1 2 3) = K(S 0 1 2 3) * 10 LDY #0 \ In the main loop below, we use Y to count the number \ of times we subtract 10 billion to get the leftmost \ digit, so set this to zero so we can rejoin the main \ loop for another subtraction process .TT36 \ This is the main loop of our digit-printing routine. \ In the following loop, we are going to count the \ number of times that we can subtract 10 million and \ store that count in Y, which we have already set to 0 LDX #3 \ Our first calculation concerns 32-bit numbers, so \ set up a counter for a four-byte loop SEC \ Set the C flag so we can do subtraction without the \ C flag affecting the result .tt37 \ We now loop through each byte in turn to do this: \ \ XX15(4 0 1 2 3) = K(S 0 1 2 3) - 100,000,000,000 LDA K,X \ Subtract the X-th byte of TENS (i.e. 10 billion) from SBC TENS,X \ the X-th byte of K STA XX15,X \ Store the result in the X-th byte of XX15 DEX \ Decrement the loop counter BPL tt37 \ Loop back to subtract the next byte, moving from the \ least significant byte to the most significant, until \ we have subtracted all four LDA S \ Subtract the fifth byte of 10 billion (i.e. &17) from SBC #&17 \ the fifth (overflow) byte of K, which is S STA XX15+4 \ Store the result in the overflow byte of XX15 BCC TT37 \ If subtracting 10 billion took us below zero, jump to \ TT37 to print out this digit, which is now in Y LDX #3 \ We now want to copy XX15(4 0 1 2 3) back into \ K(S 0 1 2 3), so we can loop back up to do the next \ subtraction, so set up a counter for a four-byte loop .tt38 LDA XX15,X \ Copy the X-th byte of XX15(0 1 2 3) to the X-th byte STA K,X \ of K(0 1 2 3), so that K(0 1 2 3) will contain a copy \ of XX15(0 1 2 3) once we've copied all four bytes DEX \ Decrement the loop counter BPL tt38 \ Loop back to copy the next byte, until we have copied \ all four LDA XX15+4 \ Store the value of location XX15+4, our overflow STA S \ byte in S, so now K(S 0 1 2 3) contains a copy of \ XX15(4 0 1 2 3) INY \ We have now managed to subtract 10 billion from our \ number, so increment Y, which is where we are keeping \ a count of the number of subtractions so far JMP TT36 \ Jump back to TT36 to subtract the next 10 billion .TT37 TYA \ If we get here then Y contains the digit that we want \ to print (as Y has now counted the total number of \ subtractions of 10 billion), so transfer Y into A BNE TT32 \ If the digit is non-zero, jump to TT32 to print it LDA T \ Otherwise the digit is zero. If we are already \ printing the number then we will want to print a 0, \ but if we haven't started printing the number yet, \ then we probably don't, as we don't want to print \ leading zeroes unless this is the only digit before \ the decimal point \ \ To help with this, we are going to use T as a flag \ that tells us whether we have already started \ printing digits: \ \ * If T <> 0 we haven't printed anything yet \ \ * If T = 0 then we have started printing digits \ \ We initially set T above to the maximum number of \ characters allowed, less 1 if we are printing a \ decimal point, so the first time we enter the digit \ printing routine at TT37, it is definitely non-zero BEQ TT32 \ If T = 0, jump straight to the print routine at TT32, \ as we have already started printing the number, so we \ definitely want to print this digit too DEC U \ We initially set U to the number of digits we want to BPL TT34 \ skip before starting to print the number. If we get \ here then we haven't printed any digits yet, so \ decrement U to see if we have reached the point where \ we should start printing the number, and if not, jump \ to TT34 to set up things for the next digit LDA #' ' \ We haven't started printing any digits yet, but we BNE tt34 \ have reached the point where we should start printing \ our number, so call TT26 (via tt34) to print a space \ so that the number is left-padded with spaces (this \ BNE is effectively a JMP as A will never be zero) .TT32 LDY #0 \ We are printing an actual digit, so first set T to 0, STY T \ to denote that we have now started printing digits as \ opposed to spaces CLC \ The digit value is in A, so add ASCII "0" to get the ADC #'0' \ ASCII character number to print .tt34 JSR TT26 \ Call TT26 to print the character in A and fall through \ into TT34 to get things ready for the next digit .TT34 DEC T \ Decrement T but keep T >= 0 (by incrementing it BPL P%+4 \ again if the above decrement made T negative) INC T DEC XX17 \ Decrement the total number of characters left to \ print, which we stored in XX17 BMI RR3+1 \ If the result is negative, we have printed all the \ characters, so return from the subroutine (as RR3 \ contains an ORA #&60 instruction, so RR3+1 is &60, \ which is the opcode for an RTS) BNE P%+10 \ If the result is positive (> 0) then we still have \ characters left to print, so loop back to TT35 (via \ the JMP TT35 instruction below) to print the next \ digit PLP \ If we get here then we have printed the exact number \ of digits that we wanted to, so restore the C flag \ that we stored at the start of the routine BCC P%+7 \ If the C flag is clear, we don't want a decimal point, \ so loop back to TT35 (via the JMP TT35 instruction \ below) to print the next digit LDA #'.' \ Otherwise the C flag is set, so print the decimal JSR TT26 \ point JMP TT35 \ Loop back to TT35 to print the next digit